PSC Pediatric Symptoms Checklist

Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC)
Age Range
4 – 18 Years
Domain
General – Internalizing, Externalizing, Attention
Owner
Massachusetts General Hospital
Avg. Duration
< 10 minutes
Licensing
Public Domain

 

Triple Red DashThe Pediatric Symptom Checklist is a brief screening questionnaire that is used by pediatricians and other health professionals to improve the recognition and treatment of psychosocial problems in children as early as possible. The target population is children between the ages of 4 – 18 years.

 

Triple Red DashThe PTI App administered PSC is the most economical, reliable and validated method to screen young children at risk for psychosocial problems and with the PTI App, administering the screening is even more complete, concise and cost-effective.

 

Triple Red DashThe PTI App provides an easy to administer screening of the PSC. Approximately 5 minutes to answer and immediate real-time scoring and reports

 

Triple Red DashThe PSC consists of 35 items that are rated as “Never,” “Sometimes,” or “Often” present and scored 0, 1, and 2, respectively. The total score is calculated by adding together the score for each of the 35 items. For children and adolescents ages 6 through 16, a cutoff score of 28 or higher indicates psychological impairment. For children ages 4 and 5, the PSC cutoff score is 24 or higher (Little et al., 1994; Pagano et al., 1996). Items that are left blank are simply ignored (i.e., score equals 0). If four or more items are left blank, the questionnaire is considered invalid.

PSC Image

 

Triple Red DashData on PSC negative screens indicate 95 percent accuracy, which, although statistically adequate, still means that 1 out of 20 children and adolescents rated as functioning adequately may actually be impaired.

 

For more information and validity information:
     http://www.massgeneral.org/psychiatry/services/psc_scoring.aspx

 

 

 


 

 

PSC Clinical Report – Sample

 

The report shows specific scores from the assessment to be used in decision making.

 

PSC Clinical Report